Interpol set to become largest shareholder after winning four votes

Four people from the UAE were elected to the organisation’s executive committee in May, including an ‘accountability’ chief who was accused of overseeing torture The UAE is set to become the largest shareholder in…

Interpol set to become largest shareholder after winning four votes

Four people from the UAE were elected to the organisation’s executive committee in May, including an ‘accountability’ chief who was accused of overseeing torture

The UAE is set to become the largest shareholder in Interpol after it secured four votes during a series of general assembly elections, including the election of an “accountability” chief who was accused of overseeing torture.

Four people from the United Arab Emirates took seats on the organisation’s executive committee in May, after the organisation’s first presidential elections, with the UAE making one of the largest gains of any nation in the world.

In a statement, the organisation defended its members, with its secretary general, Jürgen Stock, defending the police organisation’s position on members with “serious human rights problems”.

Interpol: human rights issues overstated and abuses ‘demonstrably’ less frequent Read more

Stock said a minority of countries had occasionally restricted freedom of expression, adding: “However, the company has always respected the free flow of information and speech.”

The head of Interpol’s independent nominating committee in 2010 described the organisation’s vetting procedures for nominating candidates as “effectively incompetent”.

Five of the eight nominations accepted for the fifth-ever presidential elections were UAE candidates, including Khalid Abdullah bin Falah al-Aradi. He is a 48-year-old Abu Dhabi-based businessman and co-founder of the Emirates Interpol Association. He will oversee Interpol’s “consequences committee”, which deals with misbehaviour by organisations in cases of misconduct.

Earlier this year he testified before an inquiry into torture tactics in Abu Dhabi following a report by Amnesty International that listed the cases of men detained and tortured in custody for criticising the UAE’s human rights record. The inquiry concluded he had helped author the report.

“Despite previous denials by the Aradi family that Khalid Abdullah served in a role directing detainee abuse during his time in UAE custody, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) confirmed the family’s claims of torture,” Amnesty said.

Mohammed Hammadi al-Khagari, a 38-year-old banker and co-founder of a Dubai business development group, also won a seat on the executive committee. He did not respond to requests for comment. Two other UAE nationals won seats in the line-up.

Eligible candidates were from Somalia, Congo, South Sudan, Madagascar, Georgia, Afghanistan, China, Afghanistan, Iran, Belarus, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Egypt, Jamaica, Lebanon, the United States, Russia, Venezuela, Kenya, Bangladesh, Nepal, Gambia, Pakistan, Brazil, China, Canada, Germany, Ecuador, Tunisia, Poland, Austria, Malaysia, Romania, Czech Republic, Japan, Kosovo, Mongolia, Brunei, Tonga, India, Czech Republic, Sri Lanka, Britain, Australia, Uganda, Jordan, Kenya, Ghana, Argentina, Trinidad and Tobago, Nicaragua, Benin, Mali, Mauritania, Mali, Niger, Zambia, Namibia, Burkina Faso, Senegal, Cameroon, Mauritania, Chad, Mauritania, Algeria, Somalia, Egypt, Pakistan, Guinea, Liberia, Madagascar, Ethiopia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Nigeria, Angola, South Africa, Sierra Leone, Ivory Coast, Senegal, Comoros, Mali, Rwanda, Burundi, Congo, Uganda, Ethiopia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Cameroon, Botswana, Mozambique, Swaziland, Zimbabwe, Gambia, Zambia, Comoros, Sao Tome & Principe, Angola, Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Uganda, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Lesotho, Moxe, Ghana, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Namibia, East Timor, Djibouti, Liberia, Kenya, Sierra Leone, Algeria, South Africa, Mozambique, Togo, Malawi, Mauritania, Nigeria, Zambia, Sudan, Rwanda, Congo, Angola, Central African Republic, Cameroun, Burundi, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Guinea, Cameroon, the Bahamas, Djibouti, Georgia, Nicaragua, Argentina, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Rwanda, South Africa, Burundi, Mozambique, Swaziland, Botswana, Liberia, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Uganda, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Angola, Malawi, Rwanda, South Africa, Central African Republic, The Gambia, Central African Republic, Zambia, Mozambique, Lesotho, Rwanda, South Africa, Kenya, Rwanda, The Gambia, Somalia, Botswana, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Afghanistan.

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