How to get an extra night’s sleep and get the most out of your flu vaccine

Those six hours of sleep (about five of which your body needs) are critical for the production of adenosine that helps the immune system fight off invaders — especially strains of influenza. Those six…

How to get an extra night’s sleep and get the most out of your flu vaccine

Those six hours of sleep (about five of which your body needs) are critical for the production of adenosine that helps the immune system fight off invaders — especially strains of influenza. Those six hours also help the body get ready for a new flu vaccine, and it helps protect against the type of flu you get the next time.

To get an efficient boost from flu vaccine, you need a vaccine that blocks the same adenosine-producing protein, the adenovirus-involved herpes virus. Given that, what if there was a way to inject it into the respiratory tract, just before you get the vaccine? That way, it would also be included in the vaccine itself.

There is. This is two weeks after the vaccine shots to help restore the good immune function that the vaccine helped set up in the first place. All you have to do is prune the adenovirus out and you’re set to make the best of your sleep.

The “V3 virus” is currently the most widely licensed vaccine for the prevention of flu in humans (no one knows what the word vaccines is for to the human eye). In clinical trials in 2018, four out of five participants who received the injected version of the V3 virus showed no signs of rejection at weeks 7 and 8 after vaccination. At six weeks after administration, 26 percent of those vaccinated with V3 virus had a degree of secondary immune cell response to the virus. That’s well above the rate of infection that typically plagues non-vaccine recipients (around 10 percent for a seasonal flu shot and 2 percent of non-seasonal swine flu victims, for example). No side effects were reported, and clinical tests on 16 healthy, community-dwelling adults demonstrated that once it was injected into the lungs, this purified adenovirus virus “migrated” throughout the body more often than other flu vaccine strains — including one flu strain known to cause disease.

Data released Friday in Lancet Infectious Diseases suggest that the V3 virus vaccine could work even better. Six times more healthy adults got the same secondary immune response in the lungs if they got the adenovirus virus (but no vaccine) after 10 weeks. This suggested that an extra three weeks might be needed to get the results the results being sought.

Of course, as with any experimental vaccine, a full regimen would require about ten shots spread over a period of about six months, starting when you get your first seasonal flu shot.

The researchers noted in their paper that their results are limited by the limited number of study participants, and by possible difficulty in translating these findings to large populations or hard-to-reach populations like military troops. They also suggested that the full boost would require substantially more preventive doses than a typical flu vaccine, since they found these secondary immune responses occur only in the lungs, which means they’d be producing a lot of mucus. So that means, as stated above, a full season of vaccinations would be needed.

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