Cops attack, net growth slows: the news you won’t want to miss this Tuesday | Quartz

— Welcome to Quartz’s daily look at the five stories everyone will be talking about today. Getting to China’s meeting with the United States Secretary of State Rex Tillerson finally headed to Beijing on…

Cops attack, net growth slows: the news you won’t want to miss this Tuesday | Quartz

— Welcome to Quartz’s daily look at the five stories everyone will be talking about today.

Getting to China’s meeting with the United States Secretary of State Rex Tillerson finally headed to Beijing on Monday after four days of travel around Asia. The trip marks the first time two senior members of the Trump administration have made stops in China as the two allies are grappling with a number of shared challenges, and are also pushing China to further restrain North Korea. Following a three-day visit to Beijing, the officials will travel to Vietnam and the Philippines for a series of meetings. While Tillerson and State Department chief spokeswoman Heather Nauert are only scheduled to brief the Chinese delegation on a wide range of issues, they are likely to focus on North Korea, trade, and other issues. Many of Tillerson’s predecessors took part in visits to Beijing following talks with the Chinese leadership, including John Kerry in 2011. But the reception Beijing may give Tillerson and his delegation is likely to be a major test of their commitment to the US-China relationship.

The shifting political landscape in Venezuela The Supreme Court’s decision to strip the opposition-controlled Congress of its last vestiges of power unleashed a cacophony of reactions in the country. The ruling is widely seen as the beginning of a coup against leftwing president Nicolás Maduro that is just getting started. Opposition leaders believe the country is rapidly “sliding into a more repressive and dictatorial climate.” Others worry that the court’s decision—which was also seen as a show of strength against protesters—will stoke fears of a coup. Maduro defended the court ruling, arguing that it was in the best interest of the country. Popular support for Maduro remains high. However, his re-election next year will be difficult and any groundswell of anger against his government may make that harder.

Tanks deployed in South Sudan The UN Mission in South Sudan ordered a precautionary evacuation of its staff on Monday due to fears that the country’s government may retaliate against UN personnel after the headquarters of the UN Population Fund, or UNFPA, were hit by gunfire over the weekend. The attack came after the UN’s new peacekeeping chief, Jean-Pierre Lacroix, announced that UN forces in South Sudan, the UN Mission in Darfur and other other deployments, could be deployed at the UN headquarters and other locations in the future. The government in South Sudan, which has clashed repeatedly with UN peacekeepers in the past, accused the UN of supporting an anti-government insurrection, an accusation both the UN and the UNFPA denied.

The huge treasure trove of data and records likely to be released after the privacy consent worksheet is complete:

Cybersecurity Court: WannaCry could soon become as much a myth as So?

Eight-day old WannaCry ransomware attack has become a lightning rod for discussions about global cybersecurity. Indeed, the WannaCry attack that has infected thousands of computers worldwide and temporarily paralyzed major governments and multinational companies like Nissan has motivated many to talk about how the world could approach cybersecurity issues better. So far, the UK, South Korea, and the US have found that WannaCry has brought home the urgent need for better data and cyber-security data collection to use in critical infrastructure, at government and corporate level, and a call for a dialog among the participants. Many observers see WannaCry as a demonstration that hackers are as effective as ever. However, they have also cautioned that the WannaCry attack is less a bellwether of the future than the highly fragmented nature of the Internet infrastructure.

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