College students protest after economics professor calls women a ‘logistical’ solution

More than 1,000 protesters chanting ‘Drunken racists are the problem’ rally against comments made by professors and others at the Northern Idaho State University campus Police have been called to a college campus in…

College students protest after economics professor calls women a 'logistical' solution

More than 1,000 protesters chanting ‘Drunken racists are the problem’ rally against comments made by professors and others at the Northern Idaho State University campus

Police have been called to a college campus in Idaho to quell protests over a workshop where an economics professor described hiring women as “a convenient way” to reduce under-representation of men in graduate programs.

More than 1,000 protesters were gathered outside Boise State University’s campus on Wednesday night for a rally against comments made by professors and others at the Northern Idaho State University campus.

“More than 1,000 people gathered, chanted, yelled, had hand signs and marched on the streets of downtown Boise,” according to student-produced reports. “The rally consisted of 1,000 people who descended upon the blue doors of Boise State and chanted from the top of the steps around the entire campus.”

“There have been some disturbing comments made during the workshop,” Boise State president Bob Kustra said. “And tonight they have inspired outrage on campus and across Idaho.”

Speaking at the same forum as Professor Matt Yoder, Kustra said the $15,000 workshop was held at a public university – where he stressed: “We have no tolerance for this kind of behavior.”

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He called on “every member of the community to refrain from anyone speaking who shows any hostility or exclusionary stance, whether intentional or not.”

Members of the crowd said the demonstration was focused on preventing race-based bias from being institutionalized at Boise State.

“If we allow this to happen, and it comes to the campus, the questions will be why not?” one female student told university newspaper, the Boise Beacon. “Why are we not talking about it?

“Our justice system today has already shown us that racism is alive and well.”

Earlier in the day, University of California, Davis, said it was investigating the February off-campus meeting where several dozen African American students from a sorority asked their fraternity and sorority pledge sponsors to not come to future events.

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