Biden committee recommends over-population solution without proposal, report says

A Biden Commission on a Supreme Court over-population proposal has voted to report their findings to the White House without taking a position on the president’s proposal to increase the number of justices. After…

Biden committee recommends over-population solution without proposal, report says

A Biden Commission on a Supreme Court over-population proposal has voted to report their findings to the White House without taking a position on the president’s proposal to increase the number of justices.

After a four-hour meeting in West Virginia on Friday, the President’s Commission on a Supreme Court Over-Population Proposal decided to “affirmatively decline to recommend specific responses at this time.” This results in the Commission unanimously recommending the process of confirming the number of Supreme Court justices without a direct recommendation. The commission will make further recommendations in the near future.

“While the Commission has agreed to all eleven stated policy preferences, it does not feel comfortable in taking a position on this request,” the resolution reads.

The group of 12 Democratic and Republican appointees of former President Barack Obama met on Friday and voted.

The Commission was created on May 30 to come up with bipartisan solutions to a Supreme Court over-population challenge that is pending before the Supreme Court.

President Donald Trump’s previous Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh, has said a constitutional provision, since abolished, allowed him to argue a very specific way to speed up the confirmation process, noting that the Supreme Court currently has an over-population.

The question is if Congress or the President could overrule a Supreme Court ruling so that more cases could be heard.

READ MORE: Here’s why the Supreme Court might be a lot smaller than it appears

The resolution noted that the Commission is allocating $2 million toward the work of the President’s Commission, which was designated in the omnibus spending bill released Jan. 4 and provides for the Commission to continue its work for a year.

(Updated Saturday, Jan. 26, 3:10 p.m. ET)

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