Art and fashion have some sort of soul-sucking problem on their hands

Art and fashion do seem to have some sort of soul-sapping problem on their hands. Not only do they insist on advertising at all times, but they have figured out that if they really…

Art and fashion have some sort of soul-sucking problem on their hands

Art and fashion do seem to have some sort of soul-sapping problem on their hands. Not only do they insist on advertising at all times, but they have figured out that if they really want us to put up with it, they need to feed us a constant stream of messages and visuals, even ones that may not directly require our approval (“You’re getting closer to your dream job,” says that ad). And that issue extends to how our fashion wishes are always served. In a venture that somewhat neatly deals with the tension between high-end fashion and Instagrammable-everything, the two most powerful spaces in the worldwide community at the moment are Instagram and Amazon. Well, in the futuristic version of the never-ending current social-media du jour, you’ll find yourself wondering, what’s the next step?

In the latest issue of Publishers Weekly, the renowned art curator, museum curator, and author Yann Arthus-Bertrand thinks that the next big challenge for the art world will be to ask itself a crucial question: How to “disrupt” the “Pop” of Instagram and its slavish crafters — those self-important souls who, well, think they’re paying “meaningful” homage to their beloved icons, in turn, scoring “the beauty of real life” in the process. This will be a hard task in a way, says Arthus-Bertrand, given how the “new AR is replacing all the old ways of using avatars, mobile phones, and so on. In short, the so-called high- art of reality, if you want to call it that, is a thing of the past.” Thus, while he sees “the icons, artists, art institutions and so on” moving to AR technology, the producers of high-end culture will still need to be careful about their targets — that is, to make sure that the “gladiator is not blind,” especially since the AR of the future will be less about the spectacle and more about the emotion and narrative.

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